Wood grain paint technique...

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i am planning on painting my kitchen cabients but would like to make them look like oak so what im wanting to know is how do i mix paint so they will look like oak please help at this time there white?

Answer: 

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Such an impressive task to take on! Good for you! It's not that hard to paint an oak-like finish onto your already white painted kitchen cabinets. Though if you want to paint your kitchen cabinets to look like oak, find out what you're dealing with first. If you have natural wood underneath the white, then you will take one direction. If your cabinets are not natural wood, you'll have to choose the other direction. Either way, here's an answer for both possible scenarios.
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We recommend that you use gloves and protective eyewear as well as protect your hair while working on this project. If you plan on using the first set of directions, you will need to use paint stripper. This can be highly toxic and requires nitrile gloves (similar to dishwashing gloves) to be worn while using it as it can, and will, melt regular latex gloves. Take it from us, paint stripper burns when it contacts skin, so keeping yourself covered is probably the best suggestion we have to offer. It's also very important to remember to have adequate ventilation when using these products (paint stripper, paint, stain, and polyurethane) as their fumes can be harmful if used in an enclosed area without proper ventilation.
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If your cabinets are painted over natural wood then here's the directions for the best possible out come. First you'll need to strip the white paint off using a paint stripper.
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Once you've removed most of the paint, next you'll need to prepare the wood by sanding it down and removing any difficult-to-reach paint. Here's where a palm sander can come in very handy. It's $25 that will save both your time and your hands (don't even get me started on your nails).
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Now that you've exposed all of the wood, stain it with an oak stain. We recommend that you apply this with a paint brush made for staining. Typically brushes allow for a more even coat of stain to be applied. Repeat this process until it achieves the color you desire. Check the directions on the side of the can as for how long to wait in between coats.
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Once the stain is full dry, apply a coat of polyurethane, this will help to protect it. It will take at least 2 coats of polyurethane to end up with a professional look. In between the coats, sand down the wood with steel wool to smooth out the surface as it may have become slightly raised from the application of the first coat. Make sure you only use steel wood in this step and not sand paper, as it may cause some scratches that could be visible afterward. Repeat these steps if needed.
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Voila a beautiful kitchen!
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If your cabinets are NOT made of a natural wood or if you don't feel comfortable with the idea of taking off all of the paint already on it, follow these directions. (Protect your hands, eyes and hair with this project as well as have proper ventilation):
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First you'll need to prepare the surface by cleaning off any existing oils with a household cleaner (something like 409) and then sand down any existing shine to allow the paint to adhere.
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Prime any bare wood with an alkyd wood primer
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For the most natural wood appearance, a coat of interior latex satin tinted to a light tan, should be applied. Allow the base coat to dry thoroughly. You can grain anything but it is generally easier if it is on a horizontal surface so you will want to paint the cabinet doors while they are laying flat.
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Mask all surfaces not to be grained, use painter's blue tape for this. Also remove all hardware such as doorknobs, hinges, and locks.
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Apply a thin, uniform coat of stain using a lint-free cloth or a natural bristle brush on a section. Work on one small section at a time.
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In the this step you will use something called a graining tool. It is almost like a stamp that will allow you to leave the look of oak in the stain. The length of the grains will depend on how you use this tool. We recommend practicing a few times before working on your cabinets or start by first graining the inside of the doors, that way, if you need a few times to get it right, no big deal. To use this tool exert pressure with your index finger, moving the tool at a constant speed, and rocking the tool slowly back and forth to create a grain or heartwood pattern.
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Move on to the next section when you are satisfied with the results.
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Grain in tight corners where the tool cannot reach using a dry brush, steel wool, or cheesecloth. (By changing the starting position of the tool on the segment (on the left side, on the right, or in the center); or by starting at the top and moving down then starting at the bottom and moving up; you can develop several different effects on the same object. The look of the grain pattern may be softened by gently brushing over the grain pattern with a dry brush or soft cloth after the stain has begun to set up, about 15 minutes.)
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After graining all of your cabinets, allow them to dry for 16-24 hours.
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Wipe or brush on a thin, even coat of stain in the direction of the grain pattern using a clean, lint-free cloth or a natural bristle brush. This will provide the coloring needed to make the door look like wood. Do not sand between coats of the stain.
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Use a dry brush to gently feather out any streaks or lap marks. Allow to dry 2 hours before top coating. (Darkness can be controlled by the amount of stain you apply. A thin second coat of stain reveals more grain and a heavier coat will mask some of the grain. Note: Dry times are affected by thickness of application, temperature, and humidity. If the combination of base coat and graining provides the look you like, this coloring step can be eliminated.)
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To protect the item and to increase the depth of the pattern, apply a coat of fast dry oil varnish or polyurethane varnish. Items exposed to direct sunlight should be finished with an exterior varnish.
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We hope this helps. Let us know how it all works out.
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If you have any further questions, feel free to contact us at any time. We're here for you!
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Best of luck with all your Jane projects!

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6 comments

31
Aug

What type of stain would you use over the painted wood. Also, would that stain be a water based as well? TY
10
Oct

My cubboards are painted Aqua from previous owners I would like to paint them in the beige family what do I need to do to prepare them for this project. I have lots of cupboard doors to paint I would like the easiest way possible.
6
Jan

Hey Jane. I would like to bring stucco wall to the interior of my home. I think it would add a Tuscany feel to my home. I was just wondering if you have any ideas on the project. Thanks so much. Sylvia
19
Jan

I just had a new front yard gate put in. The wood slats are cedar and the 4x4 posts are a green treated wood. I'd like to paint it white. Do I need to sand and primer it all first? Clueless minds need to know. Thanks for any help.
6
Mar

Can you give me any tips on painting a mahogony faux finish on (Non-wood) cabinets. specifically the colors to use and any tips. If you know of a class which teaches this technique in the southern U.S. please let me know. Loretta
13
Jan

can you help me with instructions for a wall coating ( faux?) that looks and feels like a tree bark effect on sheetrock. We seen this in a log cabin in S. Indiana and the woman told us her daughter took a class in Colorado.That's all we could get.It had the look and feel of the bark of a tree. Thanks so much.